Italia tipica

Barley from Alta Tuscia

Alta Tuscia is a hilly area in the Lazio region, with volcanic soil. Here you’ll find a white barley with an unmistakable texture, and if you’ve tried it, you’ll know what we mean. And if not, here’s a good excuse to try something new.

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Alta Tuscia is a hilly area in the Lazio region, with volcanic soil. Here you’ll find a white barley with an unmistakable texture, and if you’ve tried it, you’ll know what we mean. And if not, here’s a good excuse to try something new.

Grown on an untouched upland plain, these lentils are renowned for holding their shape during cooking. And also for their splendid flowers which, alongside those of Castelluccio di Norcia, help to make Umbria one of Italy’s most colourful regions.

The best selection of spelt. Introducing spelt from the Crete Senesi with its characteristic gold colour and which, despite coming from a barren landscape (“Crete” in Italian also means clay), is generous in flavour.

White with icy grey veins, a unique arched shape and renowned for their subtle flavour, these cannellini beans are harvested in Piedmont in summer ready to become a fixture in your cupboards and a key ingredient in your mains while enriching your sides.

Puglia in July offers up not only breathtaking views and great swimming; it also brings you Murgia chickpeas, famed for their wrinkled and misshapen appearance but above all their tastiness.

“Stregoni” is Italian for “sorcerers” and the magic of these beans lies in their subtle flavour. Highly prized, tender and larger in size, they grow near the Alps and, being accustomed to wide swings in temperature, are suitable for both hot dishes and cold salads.